Thursday, September 23, 2010

Goldenrod Sunsets

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Joe-Pye Weed, Goldenrod, New England Asters, Tall Yellow Coneflower, Ironweed and all the wild flowers of fall! Didn't God go all out when he planted these in their complimenting shades to bloom together, yellow, purple, mauve pink and green? They are filling up the roadsides and the pastures now with their grand splashes of color.
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I am thankful that the beautiful, soft cows leave the ironweed to bloom purple in the fields.
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I quite simply love Goldenrod and God must love it too the way He spews it around on every field and every spare corner.

Right now, out-of-doors, it is like splendor. No where are there more riches than the gold, the ruby, the sparkles, the velvets that await us there.
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4 comments:

  1. Don'tcha think it's that beautiful golden rod that makes your allergies so bad this time of year?

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  2. Patty I guess goldenrod has gotten a bad rap for something it doesn't do. Goldenrod's pollen is heavy and sticky and is not blown by the wind. Ragweed is the plant that blooms alongside goldenrod lots of times and has the light wind blown pollen that makes us suffer. You won't find any ragweed in my yard! But it is around, sigh.

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  4. I went on a web hunt. I guess The pollen from ragweed is the PRIMARY cause of hay fever. Pollen production ends when temperatures begin dropping below 60 °F. I am looking forward to those lower temperatures!

    Here is a good website

    http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=19&cont=264

    According to those in the know it is not the big, showy flowers that have this kind of troublesome pollen but it is the drab flowers that have little scent. Do you suppose these drab flowers are jealous of the pretty ones and just want to get attention?

    Sometimes I have wondered if it is silly of me to grow so many plants when I suffer from hay fever. But I guess I can learn which plants to avoid. I got scared thinking maybe my New England Asters were a problem but I think not. The site lists cocklebur, lamb's quarters, plantain, pigweed, tumbleweed or Russian thistle and sagebrush as as the culprits.

    Well there is no tumbleweed swirling through these Ohio fields but I have let lamb's quarters, plaintain and pigweed live here, I had no idea! I wish they had listed the latin name of the pigweed as there are so many wild plants nicknamed that I am not sure if the little pink ones that I like are them or not. But plantian, who would have imagined?

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What do you think?